An Update on this Blog and also Cleaning Up House

I would like to preface this blog by saying that I am very sorry for the lack of content on here. Life can be overwhelming and this blog was put on the back burner throughout the semester. This being said I am excited to give my opinions on some really interesting content that I have been reading about.

The blog post I decided to write about for my blog post is aptly named “Clean, high quality code: a guide on how to become a better programmer”. I decided to research this topic a bit because while I feel like I have a good grasp on the technical side of programming I have trouble keeping my programs neat. This issue becomes very apparent when you decide to update a program you haven’t looked at in a month or so and it is complete nonsense that is almost impossible to parse no matter how much time you look at it. This problem is exponentially larger when others have to collaborate on projects with me and find it difficult to contribute to the giant ball of garbage I have artfully crafted with my keyboard. I long for the day where every aspect of my programs shine like a well polished stone and I am proud to add projects I have created to my resume.

The blog starts off with asking the very appropriate question “what is clean code?”. To which it replies with an image that genuinely made me laugh out loud. It illustrates that code can be measured in how many “WTFs” can be heard from others reading the code. While this is hilarious it also lies very much in truth. The less confusion others have while reading your programs the cleaner it is. The first half of the post is mainly outlining why clean code is good and why bad code is bad. It explains it extremely well using metaphors such as “leave the campsite cleaner than you left it.” After the post goes into detail giving tips as to how one should name variables and functions. Many of the ideas in the blog I have never given any thought to like naming functions verbs and naming variables nouns. While this is extremely intuitive I can guarantee that I have done the contrary which resulted in the use of functions being lost in translation. Interestingly enough the blog claims that having functions that are so clear in their intent that comments are unnecessary is how one achieves code nirvana.

Overall I’d recommend this to anyone who hasn’t taken the time to lay some base guidelines while they are writing programs. All of the information given in the post is very useful.

Image result for hoarder
Visual representation of my code before reading the blog
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